I said I would never do that again 😭

But I learned something new again yesterday

these bodies we think are ours?

They’re not.

We think they own them, we signed them over the moment we agreed to save our selves from the disease that’s killing us every day, see how that works?

Cancer: you get to kill me.

Doctors: you get to save me by any means necessary

Me: I TECHNICALLY have a say… but…

Believe me, there is ALWAYS a but

If you start saying no to things, how can they save you by any means necessary?

Anyone can go on from the outside and say there’s always a choice etc etc, and yes there absolutely is. We always have choices, mine often look something like this:

your veins aren’t working for the 189th time in your life, let’s rush you off to a secret room after after having poked you 7 times – and we will surprise you with a procedure you swore you would NEVER.EVER.EVER do Again – (text here)  I wrote about in previous times to GREAT lengths because it caused you such trauma the last therapy during MIBG (and out of all the things you’ve had done.. that’s saying a lot), just the mention of it is traumatic. 

My words aren’t coming out, no one is listening to me. What good would it do anyways? It’s now my only alternative to receive the treatment I’m here for. 

Ever wonder why the term cancer sucks is so popular? Why so many people want to say fuck cancer? ….

this is why. 

It’s because of situations like this, when you are no longer a person, when you no longer have a say in your own body in order to save yourself.. because you know that you’re damned if you do and you’re damned if you don’t. 



Facetune

Part 1: 05/23/2017 – PRRT treatment prep

jugular insertion 



Facetune

But I’m tired now

Facetune

I’ll leave you with something good, as I always do… I was greeted with my Doctor cupcakes (my husband), after some kisses 💋, and pain control, I was ready to start my treatment in a little less agony.

(My clinical trial doctor) is amazing, and does everything to administer the treatment in a comfortable fashion.

The treatment itself was a bit improved VS the last few times.

More on that later once I’m not so traumatized from the morning, and tired & in pain.

FABULLLLUS IS EXHAUSTED. 🖐🏼🏥

more fun trial stuff soon, byeeeeee

#pheovsfabulous

Your Money or Your Life

A fascinating article detailing one of the very few known patients in the world with neuroendocrine tumors trying immunotherapy drugs to try as an alternative approach to this disease when the others stop working. So important and inspiring for patients like myself who will eventually be at this turning point, and need this information. Danielle, thank you for sharing your story so that others like myself can have a fighting chance in the future.

It still amazes me each time I read the disgusting price we must pay when it comes to keeping ourselves alive, how is it okay that because a drug is approved for one type of cancer it will cost 6$ Australian but 5000$ A SHOT for this woman? This is the price we pay for being rare, one of the many issues we face as a rare disease, as Ronny so perfectly put it… one should never be in a situation where we are forced to think about “money or life”, but we do and we will constantly have to. It’s not enough that we must worry about our cancer being incurable, then when we do have someone willing to try a drug on an experimental basis for the rest of the population of those who will suffer with this disease, it comes down to a price tag.

I know of VERY few people who are trying these drugs for pheo in the world, the more information and experiences we have and share, the better @Ronny, you always do an incredible job at getting the stories out there., Thank you 💛✌🏼️

Keep sharing our messages

Ronny Allan - Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer

Danielle “old enough to know better but young enough not to die of cancer”

I first wrote about Danielle Tindle in Nov 2015 as I was really inspired by her story. The inspiration came with a message of hope. Some of you will know that I have a lot of time for inspiring patient stories such as this one also knowing that I believe these should be at the forefront of international and national campaigns.

I just published a new blog entitled simply …. I CAN.   Danielle Tindle is one example of someone who can.  A young person who had gone through grueling treatment (several chemos and stem cell treatment) to get rid of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and just when she thought her life was back and near the end of a PhD, they found a Neuroendocrine Tumour in her neck near the larynx which was inoperable and chemo was…

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